superkwa: not that girl
i'll tumblr for ya...
superkwa: not that girl
+
ashesforjustice:

kararikue:

oscurovolpe:

crimesandkillers:

Faces of school shooters

Look at all the white faces without the label of terrorist under their pictures!
Where are the derogatory slurs that make the crimes a result of their race/culture?
Where are the think pieces that make their “strange/foreign” religion a key factor in their decision?

When society has taught cis straight white men that they are entitled to everything, why does it surprise us that when it’s denied they turn violent?


Hmph. Scary…
ashesforjustice:

kararikue:

oscurovolpe:

crimesandkillers:

Faces of school shooters

Look at all the white faces without the label of terrorist under their pictures!
Where are the derogatory slurs that make the crimes a result of their race/culture?
Where are the think pieces that make their “strange/foreign” religion a key factor in their decision?

When society has taught cis straight white men that they are entitled to everything, why does it surprise us that when it’s denied they turn violent?


Hmph. Scary…
ashesforjustice:

kararikue:

oscurovolpe:

crimesandkillers:

Faces of school shooters

Look at all the white faces without the label of terrorist under their pictures!
Where are the derogatory slurs that make the crimes a result of their race/culture?
Where are the think pieces that make their “strange/foreign” religion a key factor in their decision?

When society has taught cis straight white men that they are entitled to everything, why does it surprise us that when it’s denied they turn violent?


Hmph. Scary…
ashesforjustice:

kararikue:

oscurovolpe:

crimesandkillers:

Faces of school shooters

Look at all the white faces without the label of terrorist under their pictures!
Where are the derogatory slurs that make the crimes a result of their race/culture?
Where are the think pieces that make their “strange/foreign” religion a key factor in their decision?

When society has taught cis straight white men that they are entitled to everything, why does it surprise us that when it’s denied they turn violent?


Hmph. Scary…
ashesforjustice:

kararikue:

oscurovolpe:

crimesandkillers:

Faces of school shooters

Look at all the white faces without the label of terrorist under their pictures!
Where are the derogatory slurs that make the crimes a result of their race/culture?
Where are the think pieces that make their “strange/foreign” religion a key factor in their decision?

When society has taught cis straight white men that they are entitled to everything, why does it surprise us that when it’s denied they turn violent?


Hmph. Scary…
ashesforjustice:

kararikue:

oscurovolpe:

crimesandkillers:

Faces of school shooters

Look at all the white faces without the label of terrorist under their pictures!
Where are the derogatory slurs that make the crimes a result of their race/culture?
Where are the think pieces that make their “strange/foreign” religion a key factor in their decision?

When society has taught cis straight white men that they are entitled to everything, why does it surprise us that when it’s denied they turn violent?


Hmph. Scary…
ashesforjustice:

kararikue:

oscurovolpe:

crimesandkillers:

Faces of school shooters

Look at all the white faces without the label of terrorist under their pictures!
Where are the derogatory slurs that make the crimes a result of their race/culture?
Where are the think pieces that make their “strange/foreign” religion a key factor in their decision?

When society has taught cis straight white men that they are entitled to everything, why does it surprise us that when it’s denied they turn violent?


Hmph. Scary…
ashesforjustice:

kararikue:

oscurovolpe:

crimesandkillers:

Faces of school shooters

Look at all the white faces without the label of terrorist under their pictures!
Where are the derogatory slurs that make the crimes a result of their race/culture?
Where are the think pieces that make their “strange/foreign” religion a key factor in their decision?

When society has taught cis straight white men that they are entitled to everything, why does it surprise us that when it’s denied they turn violent?


Hmph. Scary…
+
"Power feminism is just another scam in which women get to play patriarchs and pretend that the power we seek and gain liberates us."

bell hooks

Let’s talk about this quote for a second.

I remember I attended a college lecture about what feminism means in America and how imperial politics and economic gaps between the West and East render what women want and consider pivotal to their feminsim as conflicting and even antagonistic to each other.

My feminism, first and foremost, will always be anti-imperialism.

Imperial politics are dangerous and the very essence of narcissism. Imperial politics demonstrated within a feminist frame usually goes as follows: the most privileged women, ie. those who have access to technology, representation, occupy a particular media-friendly image or ideology and have access to those in higher slots in society are allotted platforms to speak about their experiences as women and without question, this gets presumptuously labelled “women’s experiences”. Being that women who are globally bestowed the highest tier are usually allowed such room to speak, their minimal struggles are then homogenized as the quintessential female experience and misogyny is wholeheartedly announced a tangible issue that can be easily eradicated out of modern Western society.

Its no accident that women of color, women in occupied regions and those who face mass political or economic repression and their words which don’t satisfy neoliberal, imperialst gaze are deemed anti-progressive, race baiters, backwards, terrorist apologists, etc. Our complex, multi-faceted struggles within a white supremacist empire tap into too many accepted status quos for the average American moderate. It forces those who legitimize the war on terror and view racism as an entity of the past to confront their own unsightly prejudices and the systematic brutality their nations enacts on various global societies, as well as within its borders. Its easier to find (and fabricate) any reason to demonize the likes of Trayvon Martin and his family for his own tragic demise or deem young Yemeni children necessary collateral damage for “the greater good” than to examine what other oppressions beyond misogyny exist that unquestionably burden the lives of otherized communities, including and especially the women in said communities.

Power feminism expects women to unanimously rejoice in the presidential election of Hillary Clinton, while her administration carries out the same murderous policies as her predecessors. Power feminism labels any legitimate criticism of influential women as inherent egregious misogyny. Power feminism devalues the loss of women’s lives abroad, while infantizling their independent resistance and stripping their agency by shamelessly declaring intervention as saving them. Power feminism within an imperialistic frame needs the hyper-demonization of otherized communities to justify its occupation. Power feminism can be even more dangerous than ruthless misogyny because of its insidious nature and lack of culpability.

(via maarnayeri)

GET THEM TOGETHER THO!!!!!!!!!!

(via mangoestho)

+
emmetttrill:

yagazieemezi:

I LOVE PRINTS!!! Growing up in Nigeria, I got stuck with school uniforms, hand-me-downs and the ‘mother hand-picked this for me’ clothes. But I was surrounded daily by vibrant traditional clothes worn by others around me as they bustled about their everyday routines; which perhaps explains my attraction to patterns. Moving to the States as a teen fueled the already present desire to fit in, to blend in, but the more I believed I was doing just that, the more I felt myself crippling with body-consciousness and self-esteem issues. So at some point during my college years, I simply let myself be and started to wear what my eyes were drawn to in order to express myself.
As fond as I am of my dark colors, I cannot get enough of my printed items because with their jumble of patterns and designs, they seem to represent who I am on the outside - Yagazie

I just love her so much…….
emmetttrill:

yagazieemezi:

I LOVE PRINTS!!! Growing up in Nigeria, I got stuck with school uniforms, hand-me-downs and the ‘mother hand-picked this for me’ clothes. But I was surrounded daily by vibrant traditional clothes worn by others around me as they bustled about their everyday routines; which perhaps explains my attraction to patterns. Moving to the States as a teen fueled the already present desire to fit in, to blend in, but the more I believed I was doing just that, the more I felt myself crippling with body-consciousness and self-esteem issues. So at some point during my college years, I simply let myself be and started to wear what my eyes were drawn to in order to express myself.
As fond as I am of my dark colors, I cannot get enough of my printed items because with their jumble of patterns and designs, they seem to represent who I am on the outside - Yagazie

I just love her so much…….
emmetttrill:

yagazieemezi:

I LOVE PRINTS!!! Growing up in Nigeria, I got stuck with school uniforms, hand-me-downs and the ‘mother hand-picked this for me’ clothes. But I was surrounded daily by vibrant traditional clothes worn by others around me as they bustled about their everyday routines; which perhaps explains my attraction to patterns. Moving to the States as a teen fueled the already present desire to fit in, to blend in, but the more I believed I was doing just that, the more I felt myself crippling with body-consciousness and self-esteem issues. So at some point during my college years, I simply let myself be and started to wear what my eyes were drawn to in order to express myself.
As fond as I am of my dark colors, I cannot get enough of my printed items because with their jumble of patterns and designs, they seem to represent who I am on the outside - Yagazie

I just love her so much…….
emmetttrill:

yagazieemezi:

I LOVE PRINTS!!! Growing up in Nigeria, I got stuck with school uniforms, hand-me-downs and the ‘mother hand-picked this for me’ clothes. But I was surrounded daily by vibrant traditional clothes worn by others around me as they bustled about their everyday routines; which perhaps explains my attraction to patterns. Moving to the States as a teen fueled the already present desire to fit in, to blend in, but the more I believed I was doing just that, the more I felt myself crippling with body-consciousness and self-esteem issues. So at some point during my college years, I simply let myself be and started to wear what my eyes were drawn to in order to express myself.
As fond as I am of my dark colors, I cannot get enough of my printed items because with their jumble of patterns and designs, they seem to represent who I am on the outside - Yagazie

I just love her so much…….
emmetttrill:

yagazieemezi:

I LOVE PRINTS!!! Growing up in Nigeria, I got stuck with school uniforms, hand-me-downs and the ‘mother hand-picked this for me’ clothes. But I was surrounded daily by vibrant traditional clothes worn by others around me as they bustled about their everyday routines; which perhaps explains my attraction to patterns. Moving to the States as a teen fueled the already present desire to fit in, to blend in, but the more I believed I was doing just that, the more I felt myself crippling with body-consciousness and self-esteem issues. So at some point during my college years, I simply let myself be and started to wear what my eyes were drawn to in order to express myself.
As fond as I am of my dark colors, I cannot get enough of my printed items because with their jumble of patterns and designs, they seem to represent who I am on the outside - Yagazie

I just love her so much…….
emmetttrill:

yagazieemezi:

I LOVE PRINTS!!! Growing up in Nigeria, I got stuck with school uniforms, hand-me-downs and the ‘mother hand-picked this for me’ clothes. But I was surrounded daily by vibrant traditional clothes worn by others around me as they bustled about their everyday routines; which perhaps explains my attraction to patterns. Moving to the States as a teen fueled the already present desire to fit in, to blend in, but the more I believed I was doing just that, the more I felt myself crippling with body-consciousness and self-esteem issues. So at some point during my college years, I simply let myself be and started to wear what my eyes were drawn to in order to express myself.
As fond as I am of my dark colors, I cannot get enough of my printed items because with their jumble of patterns and designs, they seem to represent who I am on the outside - Yagazie

I just love her so much…….
emmetttrill:

yagazieemezi:

I LOVE PRINTS!!! Growing up in Nigeria, I got stuck with school uniforms, hand-me-downs and the ‘mother hand-picked this for me’ clothes. But I was surrounded daily by vibrant traditional clothes worn by others around me as they bustled about their everyday routines; which perhaps explains my attraction to patterns. Moving to the States as a teen fueled the already present desire to fit in, to blend in, but the more I believed I was doing just that, the more I felt myself crippling with body-consciousness and self-esteem issues. So at some point during my college years, I simply let myself be and started to wear what my eyes were drawn to in order to express myself.
As fond as I am of my dark colors, I cannot get enough of my printed items because with their jumble of patterns and designs, they seem to represent who I am on the outside - Yagazie

I just love her so much…….
+
thinblackbeauty:

yarrahs-life:

Ow! Don’t play with it like that….

Daaaaaayum
thinblackbeauty:

yarrahs-life:

Ow! Don’t play with it like that….

Daaaaaayum
thinblackbeauty:

yarrahs-life:

Ow! Don’t play with it like that….

Daaaaaayum
thinblackbeauty:

yarrahs-life:

Ow! Don’t play with it like that….

Daaaaaayum
thinblackbeauty:

yarrahs-life:

Ow! Don’t play with it like that….

Daaaaaayum
+
+
kushandwizdom:

More?
+
loquence:

dynamic narratives//multi-media//amber williams-king
Through the layering of digital prints, printed cloth and paint, this work in progress seeks to capture and explore the intricacies of identity in a Caribbean context. The use of collage is a means of acknowledging and examining the complexity of being.
loquence:

dynamic narratives//multi-media//amber williams-king
Through the layering of digital prints, printed cloth and paint, this work in progress seeks to capture and explore the intricacies of identity in a Caribbean context. The use of collage is a means of acknowledging and examining the complexity of being.
loquence:

dynamic narratives//multi-media//amber williams-king
Through the layering of digital prints, printed cloth and paint, this work in progress seeks to capture and explore the intricacies of identity in a Caribbean context. The use of collage is a means of acknowledging and examining the complexity of being.
loquence:

dynamic narratives//multi-media//amber williams-king
Through the layering of digital prints, printed cloth and paint, this work in progress seeks to capture and explore the intricacies of identity in a Caribbean context. The use of collage is a means of acknowledging and examining the complexity of being.
+

"as an African…" [x] - Chimamanda Adichie’s “The Danger of a Single Story”gif

"as an African…" [x] - Chimamanda Adichie’s “The Danger of a Single Story”gif

"as an African…" [x] - Chimamanda Adichie’s “The Danger of a Single Story”gif

"as an African…" [x] - Chimamanda Adichie’s “The Danger of a Single Story”gif

"as an African…" [x] - Chimamanda Adichie’s “The Danger of a Single Story”gif

"as an African…" [x] - Chimamanda Adichie’s “The Danger of a Single Story”gif
+
"

My inaugural year on Grey’s Anatomy was defined by two points: my character’s boyfriend and the episode when said relationship began. For the audience, the episode is noteworthy because it features a classic spectacles-to-contacts, curly-to-straight transformation. For myself it’s noteworthy because, even after Carol’s Daughter in Sephora, I Am Not My Hair on Billboard’s Hot 100 and decades of mop-headed kids in GAP commercials, the public still goes batshit over bone-straight hair on a black woman.

After the episode aired, the praise I received from strangers, friends and even my own family was staggering. I suddenly had mass-appeal and the undertone was clear: with a single blow-dry, I had arrived.

What was intended as flattery was profoundly insulting and it hurt me deeply to realize my natural form wasn’t considered feminine or desirable.

The response ignited that same young rebellion I had all those years ago. My hair had graduated from the purview of my parents to become of direct concern to the masses and, in both cases, no one considered the effect on the person at the center.

"

Jerrika Hinton in Creating A Center Part

She plays Stephanie Edwards (the Black female intern) on Grey’s Anatomy. I follow her on here and twitter and remember when this episode aired, she posted something along the lines of funny how a little hair straightening changes everything (paraphrasing). I knew then that she was one of my faves…so glad she went through with writing this up.

(via stopwhitewashing)
+
instagram:

Documenting South Africa’s Farewell to Nelson Mandela with @danielberehulak

To view photos and videos from the 10 days of mourning for Nelson Mandela, follow @danielberehulak on Instagram.

Following the news of Nelson Mandela’s death, Australian photojournalist Daniel Berehulak (@danielberehulak) has been sharing scenes from the 10 days of mourning.

From the crowds which gathered to pay respects outside the former South African president’s home in Houghton, Johannesburg, to the stands of the First National Bank (FNB) stadium for the state memorial service, Daniel has been sharing photos while covering the story for the New York Times, choosing moments and outtakes which wouldn’t make the picture desk cut.

Some of the most moving photos from the last 10 days show crowds thronging the pavements along the route of the funeral procession being lead through Pretoria. He said the atmosphere along the route was one of joy—with people celebrating Mandela’s life more than mourning it.

"The mood indeed has been mixed, with people overcome with emotion only shortly after witnessing the cortège driving past, with the reality probably setting in," he said. "Thousands and thousands of people lined up to catch buses in order to pay their respects to Nelson Mandela. The mood was incredibly jovial despite the sombre reality. People want to celebrate his life rather than mourn it. They were certainly marking it by singing and dancing in the streets."

Daniel’s photos have captured a nation in mourning for a leader and the celebration of an outstanding life. “People were paying homage to his incredible life and the impact that he and had on South Africa and what he meant to people across the world.”  On Sunday, a traditional burial ceremony took place in Qunu, Mandela’s Eastern Cape home town.
instagram:

Documenting South Africa’s Farewell to Nelson Mandela with @danielberehulak

To view photos and videos from the 10 days of mourning for Nelson Mandela, follow @danielberehulak on Instagram.

Following the news of Nelson Mandela’s death, Australian photojournalist Daniel Berehulak (@danielberehulak) has been sharing scenes from the 10 days of mourning.

From the crowds which gathered to pay respects outside the former South African president’s home in Houghton, Johannesburg, to the stands of the First National Bank (FNB) stadium for the state memorial service, Daniel has been sharing photos while covering the story for the New York Times, choosing moments and outtakes which wouldn’t make the picture desk cut.

Some of the most moving photos from the last 10 days show crowds thronging the pavements along the route of the funeral procession being lead through Pretoria. He said the atmosphere along the route was one of joy—with people celebrating Mandela’s life more than mourning it.

"The mood indeed has been mixed, with people overcome with emotion only shortly after witnessing the cortège driving past, with the reality probably setting in," he said. "Thousands and thousands of people lined up to catch buses in order to pay their respects to Nelson Mandela. The mood was incredibly jovial despite the sombre reality. People want to celebrate his life rather than mourn it. They were certainly marking it by singing and dancing in the streets."

Daniel’s photos have captured a nation in mourning for a leader and the celebration of an outstanding life. “People were paying homage to his incredible life and the impact that he and had on South Africa and what he meant to people across the world.”  On Sunday, a traditional burial ceremony took place in Qunu, Mandela’s Eastern Cape home town.
instagram:

Documenting South Africa’s Farewell to Nelson Mandela with @danielberehulak

To view photos and videos from the 10 days of mourning for Nelson Mandela, follow @danielberehulak on Instagram.

Following the news of Nelson Mandela’s death, Australian photojournalist Daniel Berehulak (@danielberehulak) has been sharing scenes from the 10 days of mourning.

From the crowds which gathered to pay respects outside the former South African president’s home in Houghton, Johannesburg, to the stands of the First National Bank (FNB) stadium for the state memorial service, Daniel has been sharing photos while covering the story for the New York Times, choosing moments and outtakes which wouldn’t make the picture desk cut.

Some of the most moving photos from the last 10 days show crowds thronging the pavements along the route of the funeral procession being lead through Pretoria. He said the atmosphere along the route was one of joy—with people celebrating Mandela’s life more than mourning it.

"The mood indeed has been mixed, with people overcome with emotion only shortly after witnessing the cortège driving past, with the reality probably setting in," he said. "Thousands and thousands of people lined up to catch buses in order to pay their respects to Nelson Mandela. The mood was incredibly jovial despite the sombre reality. People want to celebrate his life rather than mourn it. They were certainly marking it by singing and dancing in the streets."

Daniel’s photos have captured a nation in mourning for a leader and the celebration of an outstanding life. “People were paying homage to his incredible life and the impact that he and had on South Africa and what he meant to people across the world.”  On Sunday, a traditional burial ceremony took place in Qunu, Mandela’s Eastern Cape home town.
instagram:

Documenting South Africa’s Farewell to Nelson Mandela with @danielberehulak

To view photos and videos from the 10 days of mourning for Nelson Mandela, follow @danielberehulak on Instagram.

Following the news of Nelson Mandela’s death, Australian photojournalist Daniel Berehulak (@danielberehulak) has been sharing scenes from the 10 days of mourning.

From the crowds which gathered to pay respects outside the former South African president’s home in Houghton, Johannesburg, to the stands of the First National Bank (FNB) stadium for the state memorial service, Daniel has been sharing photos while covering the story for the New York Times, choosing moments and outtakes which wouldn’t make the picture desk cut.

Some of the most moving photos from the last 10 days show crowds thronging the pavements along the route of the funeral procession being lead through Pretoria. He said the atmosphere along the route was one of joy—with people celebrating Mandela’s life more than mourning it.

"The mood indeed has been mixed, with people overcome with emotion only shortly after witnessing the cortège driving past, with the reality probably setting in," he said. "Thousands and thousands of people lined up to catch buses in order to pay their respects to Nelson Mandela. The mood was incredibly jovial despite the sombre reality. People want to celebrate his life rather than mourn it. They were certainly marking it by singing and dancing in the streets."

Daniel’s photos have captured a nation in mourning for a leader and the celebration of an outstanding life. “People were paying homage to his incredible life and the impact that he and had on South Africa and what he meant to people across the world.”  On Sunday, a traditional burial ceremony took place in Qunu, Mandela’s Eastern Cape home town.
instagram:

Documenting South Africa’s Farewell to Nelson Mandela with @danielberehulak

To view photos and videos from the 10 days of mourning for Nelson Mandela, follow @danielberehulak on Instagram.

Following the news of Nelson Mandela’s death, Australian photojournalist Daniel Berehulak (@danielberehulak) has been sharing scenes from the 10 days of mourning.

From the crowds which gathered to pay respects outside the former South African president’s home in Houghton, Johannesburg, to the stands of the First National Bank (FNB) stadium for the state memorial service, Daniel has been sharing photos while covering the story for the New York Times, choosing moments and outtakes which wouldn’t make the picture desk cut.

Some of the most moving photos from the last 10 days show crowds thronging the pavements along the route of the funeral procession being lead through Pretoria. He said the atmosphere along the route was one of joy—with people celebrating Mandela’s life more than mourning it.

"The mood indeed has been mixed, with people overcome with emotion only shortly after witnessing the cortège driving past, with the reality probably setting in," he said. "Thousands and thousands of people lined up to catch buses in order to pay their respects to Nelson Mandela. The mood was incredibly jovial despite the sombre reality. People want to celebrate his life rather than mourn it. They were certainly marking it by singing and dancing in the streets."

Daniel’s photos have captured a nation in mourning for a leader and the celebration of an outstanding life. “People were paying homage to his incredible life and the impact that he and had on South Africa and what he meant to people across the world.”  On Sunday, a traditional burial ceremony took place in Qunu, Mandela’s Eastern Cape home town.